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Pros and Cons of Constant Sports Media Coverage

crazy

Has all of Twitter gone Crazy?!?! It’s everywhere.  And it’s in your face all of the time:  Sports Media Coverage.

I actually recall days just ten years ago when SportsCenter would air a live episode at 7am and then air the same one over and over again all morning long until another new one at say 1pm or maybe wait until 5pm! GASP!

How did we survive without all of the constant sports media coverage?  How did we make it without knowing what Tim Tebow was doing all of the time? Social Media and the new connected economy and the digital age have brought us sports media coverage that is constant, all consuming, and impossible to keep up with. The question is…

What Can Stay and What Can Go: Pros and Cons

ProsPROS!

  1. You stay informed and you find out about stuff that you would never have known before until the time the game starts.  Your fantasy lineups are more accurate, you can show up late to a game if you know your favorite star isn’t going to play, and you get new behind the scenes ways to view these athletes.  Think ESPN 30 for 30 and other intimate pieces that truly do capture the heart and the mind of the athlete more than ever thought possible!
  2. From a business standpoint we are delivering a much superior product to our clients and to the fans.  If you are in sports sponsorships, marketing, or any other department you are bringing a product to the table that has ten times the relevancy and information than was around just five years ago.  You are becoming more valuable, smarter, and more dedicated and that’s important from a sports business sense.
  3. Giving the consumer what every other news outlet is doing in the world.  Face it you would be thought of as slow and behind the times if weren’t offering constant and updated sports media coverage.  Sports would perhaps lose fanfare and exposure if all of the sudden there were no updates for days.

ConsCONS!

  1. The unnecessary information.  There are great updates that happen in the middle of the day and overnight.  But there’s also a lot of filler and it’s created boring and unnecessary news (I’m looking at you, Tebow!)  It’s forcing anchors and writers to try to create excitement to you when it’s not worth batting an eye.
  2. It never ends.  It can be hard to please a client from a sports business side when there is no end game.  It’s just one thing after the other and there’s no end in sight.  The media coverage is somewhat similar to the soap opera that Vince McMahon has cooked up since the early 1980′s in the WWE.  There’s never a finality.  And for clients that’s hard.  Because they hope to reach their goals with your partnership but the second it ends companies want to sell them something else without looking back on the good and the bad of what we just did.
  3. We could honestly read Tweets all day long on air (Mike and Mike ahem sorry clearing my throat).  It’s gotten a little absurd.  But it also gives people a voice that was prior to this completely unheard and impossible!  I guess this one is a pro and a con!

When we truly break it down it goes back to the age old philosophy that everything in moderation is okay. Choose to intake what you want to intake.  You are never going to cover it all.  Don’t try to keep up because the stuff that you miss isn’t all that important.

But on the plus side we now have new voices, great ways to engage clients with their customers, and a new vision of the modern day athlete and sports world that we didn’t previously understand. Choose to digest what you want to digest just try to not go overload on it or you’ll find yourself going cross eyed and a little crazy!

Thanks for reading everybody!!  Care to share your thoughts?? Leave a comment below, tweet us @SportsNetworker, or you can email me directly at [email protected].

Carpe Diem, Peeps!

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